GROWTH, BIOMASS PARTITIONING AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF YOUNG PLANTS OF Genipa spruceana SUBJECTED TO FLOODING

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José Francisco de Carvalho Gonçalves Emanuelle Gurgel de Freitas Melo Marciel José Ferreira Carlos Eduardo Moura da Silva Iane Barroncas Gomes

Abstract

Genipa spruceana Steyerm (Rubiaceae) is a species often found in flooded environments in the central Amazonia. The objective of this study was elucidate possible adaptive strategies that enable this species to occupy environments under flooding, targeting the potential of the species for restoration of floodplains. In order to achieve these objectives growth traits, number of leaves, leaf expansion, biomass production, carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance were investigated in G. spruceana seedlings subjected to treatments: 1- Non flooded plants (control –SA), 2- partially flooded (PA) and 3- completely flooded (TA) up to 90 days. Flooded treatments (PA and TA) induced smaller increments in all variables of height and diameter growth when compared to the control treatment. With increase of flooding, biomass allocation to leaves decreased until complete leaf abscission in TA, while increased in the stem. In PA treatment was observed reduction in C assimilation rates of 58% and 64% after 60 and 90 days, respectively, and 96% after 60 days in TA treatment. However, in the end of the experiment all treatments presented 100% of survival. Our results indicate that the loss of leaves and gain of the stem biomass can be protective strategy to alleviate the harmful effects of the flooding. On the other hand, the maxim survival rates suggest that G. spruceana exhibit high potential for establishment in frequently flooded areas. 

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How to Cite
GONÇALVES, José Francisco de Carvalho et al. GROWTH, BIOMASS PARTITIONING AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF YOUNG PLANTS OF Genipa spruceana SUBJECTED TO FLOODING. CERNE, [S.l.], v. 19, n. 2, p. 193-200, apr. 2016. ISSN 2317-6342. Available at: <http://cerne.ufla.br/site/index.php/CERNE/article/view/893>. Date accessed: 16 sep. 2019.
Keywords
Flood tolerance, carbon assimilation, Rubiaceae, tropical tree species.
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